Cardinal Tobin offers sermon for Black History Month

February is Black History Month, which provides opportunities to share in the rich history and heritage of our Christian faith. African-American Catholics created a very remarkable movement of faith and evangelization here in the United States, and many courageous people played pivotal roles in Church history.

A special Mass was celebrated last Sunday for Black History Month at the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart in the Archdiocese of Newark. Cardinal Joseph Tobin gave the sermon, which was broadcast recently on Morning Air®Below is an excerpt of Cardinal Tobin’s sermon:

“Brothers and sisters, let us not forget our mothers and fathers, the saints, the religious orders, the fraternal societies of the black Catholic Church. Let us not forget the leaders of African-American people in this country. Let us remember, on the 50th year of his assassination, his martyrdom, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Dr. King is commonly portrayed as a cultural and political activist. But you who know him realize that the vision he articulated wasn’t simply a political one. Dr. King’s vision was deeply rooted in the Word of God. There is a reason that so many of Dr. King’s most famous speeches have the impact and spiritual punch of sermons. Many of them were sermons. And all of them draw on King’s conviction that true love for God and His Word involve actively pursuing justice, across racial and ethnic boundaries.

So as we recall our heroes, and their contributions, let us thank God for the big mistake of oppressors who put the Word of God into the hands of the oppressed. And thereby unwittingly sowed the seeds of their own destruction. For the oppressed learned the truth, and the truth sets them free.”

Listen to the full sermon below:

Morning Air can be heard weekdays from 6:00 – 9:00 a.m. Eastern/3:00 – 6:00 a.m. Pacific on Relevant Radio®.